Andrew J. White, M.D.  white@kids.wustl.edu

Director, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology
James P. Keating, MD, Professor of Pediatrics
Patient Oriented Research UnitRheumatologyPediatric Residency

phone:

Education

  • BA, Brandeis University1986
  • MSc, University of Chicago1989
  • MD, University of Texas Southwestern1994

Training

  • Pediatric Residency, St Louis Children's Hospital1994 - 1997
  • Pediatric Rheumatology and Immunology Fellowship, Washington University1997 - 2000
  • Evidence Based Clinical Practice, McMaster University2003 - 2003
  • Leadership Development for Physicians in Academic Health Centers, Harvard University2015 - 2015
  • Advanced Management Certificate , Olin School of Business2016

Licensure and Board Certification

  • MO, 
  • American Board of Pediatrics; General Pediatrics 1999
  • American Board of Pediatrics; Pediatric Rheumatology 2000

Honors

  • Clinical Teacher of the Year, Washington University School of Medicine2004
  • Clinical Teacher of the Year, Washington University School of Medicine2007
  • Clinical Teacher of the Year, Washington University School of Medicine2010
  • POM Small-Group Leader of the Year Award, Washington University School of Medicine2010
  • AOA Honor Society, Washington University School of Medicine2011
  • Distinguished Clinician Award, Washington University School of Medicine2011
  • The Phillip R Dodge Scholar in Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine2014
  • Clinical Teacher of the Year, Washington University School of Medicine2015

Selected Publications view all (49)


1.
Azathioprine therapy for steroid-resistant Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a report of 6 cases. Pediatr Rheumatol Online J. 2016;14(1):37. PMCID:PMC4918135  PMID:27333803 
2.
Comparing presenting clinical features of 48 children with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) against 183 having granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). An ARChiVe study. Arthritis Rheumatol. 2016. PMID:27111558 
3.
The ACVRL1 c.314-35A>G polymorphism is associated with organ vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients with ENG mutations, but not in patients with ACVRL1 mutations. Am J Med Genet A. 2015;167(6):1262-7. PMCID:PMC4449292  PMID:25847705 
4.
Hemorrhage rates from brain arteriovenous malformation in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Stroke. 2015;46(5):1362-4. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.007367  PMCID:PMC4415515  PMID:25858236 
5.
Neurovascular manifestations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: imaging features and genotype-phenotype correlations. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2015;36(5):863-70. PMCID:PMC4433843  PMID:25572952 
6.
Mesenteric vasculitis in children with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clin Rheumatol. 2015. doi:10.1007/s10067-015-2892-3  PMID:25687984 
7.
Early-onset lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity caused by germline STAT3 gain-of-function mutations. Blood. 2015;125(4):591-9. doi:10.1182/blood-2014-09-602763  PMCID:PMC4304103  PMID:25359994 
8.
Severity score for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2014;9:188. PMCID:PMC4302697  PMID:25928712 
9.
Changes in medical errors after implementation of a handoff program. N Engl J Med. 2014;371(19):1803-12. doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1405556  PMID:25372088 
10.
Novel method to collect medication adverse events in juvenile arthritis: results from the childhood arthritis and rheumatology research alliance enhanced drug safety surveillance project. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2014. doi:10.1002/acr.22487  PMID:25331530 
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