Kristine Wylie, Ph.D.  kwylie@wustl.edu

Infectious DiseasesPathobiology

phone: (314) 454-6050

Research Interests

Dr. Kristine Wylie is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine and the McDonnell Genome Institute. Her main research interest is the human microbiome and its relationship to health and disease. During Dr. Wylie’s postdoctoral work, she developed methods for analyzing high-throughput metagenomic shotgun sequence data sets to study the human virome, the viral component of the microbiome. Dr. Wylie analyzed the human virome (eukaryotic viruses) in the healthy subjects from the Human Microbiome Project, providing the first analysis of the commensal virome in a large cohort of generally healthy, asymptomatic people. With Dr. Gregory Storch in Pediatrics, she studied the viromes in children in a study aimed at understanding the role of viruses in children with unexplained fevers. She and her colleagues determined that viruses are frequently found in samples from children with unexplained fever. Dr. Wylie and her colleagues recently developed a targeted sequence capture panel, ViroCap, designed to enrich nucleic acid from eukaryotic DNA and RNA viruses from 34 families that infect vertebrate hosts. This approach will greatly enhance the study of eukaryotic viruses and takes us closer to using high-throughput sequencing as a comprehensive viral diagnostic tool. Dr. Wylie is currently involved in many collaborative efforts that use high-throughput sequencing to study the microbiome and its association with disease.

Education

  • BA, Southern Illinois University1996
  • PhD, Saint Louis University2009

Training

  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Washington University School of Medicine2009 - 2013

Honors

  • Michael R. Levy Award in Cellular and Molecular Biology, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville1996
  • Sigma Xi, Saint Louis University2004
  • Presidential Fellowship, Saint Louis University2004 - 2008
  • Student travel award, American Society for Virology 27th Annual Meeting2008
  • Alpha Sigma Nu Jesuit Honor Society2009
  • Student travel award, American Society for Virology 28th Annual Meeting2009
  • Graduate Student of the Year, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Saint Louis University2009 - 2010
  • NHGRI Genome Advance of the Month, The Human Microbiome Project: Extending the definition of what constitutes a human2012

Selected Publications view all (45)


1.
Enhanced virome sequencing using targeted sequence capture. Genome Res. 2015;25(12):1910-20. doi:10.1101/gr.191049.115  PMID:26395152 
2.
Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay. J Clin Microbiol. 2015;53(8):2641-7. doi:10.1128/JCM.00923-15  PMCID:PMC4508392  PMID:26063859 
3.
Enterovirus D68-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome in adult, United States, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2015;21(5):914-6. doi:10.3201/eid2105.142033  PMCID:PMC4412249  PMID:25897542 
4.
Genome sequence of enterovirus D68 from St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2015;21(1):184-6. doi:10.3201/eid2101.141605  PMCID:PMC4285240  PMID:25532062 
5.
Metagenomic analysis of double-stranded DNA viruses in healthy adults. BMC Biol. 2014;12(1):71. doi:10.1186/s12915-014-0071-7  PMCID:PMC4177058  PMID:25212266 
6.
Exploration of bacterial community classes in major human habitats. Genome Biol. 2014;15(5):R66. doi:10.1186/gb-2014-15-5-r66  PMCID:PMC4073010  PMID:24887286 
7.
Virome genomics: a tool for defining the human virome. Curr Opin Microbiol. 2013;16(4):479-84. doi:10.1016/j.mib.2013.04.006  PMCID:PMC3755052  PMID:23706900 
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