Todd Druley, M.D., Ph.D.  druley_t@kids.wustl.edu

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics
Developmental BiologyGeneticsHematology and Oncology

phone: (314) 454-6018

Research Interests

Dr. Druley's lab used computational and molecular biology to characterize the role of germline genetic variation in patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cell models in predisposing to pediatric cancer.

Education

  • PhD, University of Illinois2002
  • MD, University of Illinois2002
  • BS, Departmental Distinction for Research, University of Illinois1994

Training

  • Resident, Washington University2002 - 2005
  • Clinical Fellow in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Washington University2005 - 2008

Licensure and Board Certification

  • American Board of Pediatrics - General Pediatrics 2006
  • MO, 2008
  • American Board of Pediatrics - Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 2013

Honors

  • Children Of Vietnam Veterans Merit Scholarship1990 - 1994
  • Research Distinction in Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois1994
  • Outstanding Fellow Teaching Award2006
  • Alex's Lemonade Stand "A" Award2009 - 2013
  • Scholar of the NIH Child Health Resource Center in Developmental Biology2009 - Pres
  • Children's Discovery Institute Faculty Scholar2010 - Pres
  • Mark Johnston Scholar in Genomic Science2010 - Pres
  • Hyundai Hope Award Recipient2011 - 2013
  • Doris Duke Clinical Scientist Development Award2014 - 2017
  • Best Poster at 2016 International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) Annual Meeting (Dublin, Ireland)2016

Selected Publications view all (41)


1.
Candidate gene resequencing to identify rare, pedigree-specific variants influencing healthy aging phenotypes in the long life family study. BMC Geriatr. 2016;16(1):80. doi:10.1186/s12877-016-0253-y  PMID:27060904 
2.
Pooled Sequencing of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Variants in the Development of Asthma Following Severe RSV Bronchiolitis in Infancy. PLoS One. 2015;10(11):e0142649. PMCID:PMC4654486  PMID:26587832 
3.
Late toxicity of a novel allogeneic stem cell transplant using single fraction total body irradiation for hematologic malignancies in children. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2015;37(2):e94-e101. doi:10.1097/MPH.0000000000000272  PMCID:PMC4337424  PMID:25333837 
4.
Role of TP53 mutations in the origin and evolution of therapy-related acute myeloid leukaemia. Nature. 2015;518(7540):552-5. doi:10.1038/nature13968  PMCID:PMC4403236  PMID:25487151 
5.
Quantifying ultra-rare pre-leukemic clones via targeted error-corrected sequencing. Leukemia. 2015. doi:10.1038/leu.2015.17  PMID:25644247 
6.
The cyclic AMP pathway is a sex-specific modifier of glioma risk in type I neurofibromatosis patients. Cancer Res. 2015;75(1):16-21. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-1891  PMCID:PMC4286430  PMID:25381154 
7.
Excess congenital non-synonymous variation in leukemia-associated genes in MLL- infant leukemia: a Children's Oncology Group report. Leukemia. 2014;28(6):1235-41. doi:10.1038/leu.2013.367  PMCID:PMC4045651  PMID:24301523 
8.
Synonymous ABCA3 variants do not increase risk for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. J Pediatr. 2014;164(6):1316-21.e3. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.02.021  PMCID:PMC4035386  PMID:24657120 
9.
Genetic variation in MKL2 and decreased downstream PCTAIRE1 expression in extreme, fatal primary human microcephaly. Clin Genet. 2014;85(5):423-32. doi:10.1111/cge.12197  PMCID:PMC3929543  PMID:23692340 
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