Kimberly S. Quayle, M.D.  quayleks@wustl.edu

Interim Director, Emergency Medicine
Professor of Pediatrics, Emergency Medicine
Patient Oriented Research UnitEmergency Medicine

phone: (314) 454-2341

Education

  • AB, Summa Cum Laude, University of Missouri-Columbia1984
  • MD, Washington University School of Medicine1988

Training

  • Residency in Pediatrics, St. Louis Children's Hospital1988 - 1991
  • Pediatric Chief Resident, St. Louis Children's Hospital1991 - 1992
  • Fellowship in Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine1992 - 1994

Licensure and Board Certification

  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support 1989
  • Diplomat, National Board of Medical Examiners 1989
  • Advanced Trauma Life Support 1991
  • American Board of Pediatrics (General) 1991
  • MO, Medical Licensure 1991
  • Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (S.A.F.E.)- Provider 1992
  • Advanced Cardiac Life Support 1993
  • American Board of Pediatrics, Subspecialty Pediatric Emergency Medicine 1996
  • Basic Life Support 1996
  • American Board of Pediatrics MOC Certification 2014

Honors

  • Curators' Scholar, University of Missouri-Columbia1981 - 1984
  • Phi Beta Kappa, University of Missouri-Columbia1984
  • Elisabeth L. Demonchaux Prize in Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine1988
  • Outstanding Teacher, Subspecialty Award, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine2002 - 2003
  • Pediatric Clinical Educator Award, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine Residents2008 - 2009
  • Triple Crown Winner, Children's Direct St. Louis Children's Hospital2012

Selected Publications view all (32)


1.
Circulating matrix metalloproteinases in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. Pediatr Diabetes. 2017;18(2):95-102. doi:10.1111/pedi.12359  PMID:26843101 
2.
Comparison of Prediction Rules and Clinician Suspicion for Identifying Children With Clinically Important Brain Injuries After Blunt Head Trauma. Acad Emerg Med. 2016;23(5):566-575. doi:10.1111/acem.12923  PMID:26825755 
3.
Relationship of Physician-identified Patient Race and Ethnicity to Use of Computed Tomography in Pediatric Blunt Torso Trauma. Acad Emerg Med. 2016;23(5):584-590. doi:10.1111/acem.12943  PMID:26914184 
4.
Television-Related Head Injuries in Children: A Secondary Analysis of a Large Cohort Study of Head-Injured Children in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2015. doi:10.1097/PEC.0000000000000605  PMID:26555312 
5.
Use of Oral Contrast for Abdominal Computed Tomography in Children With Blunt Torso Trauma. Ann Emerg Med. 2015;66(2):107-114.e4. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.01.014  PMID:25794610 
6.
Sensitivity of plain pelvis radiography in children with blunt torso trauma. Ann Emerg Med. 2015;65(1):63-71.e1. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.06.017  PMID:25086474 
7.
Accuracy of the abdominal examination for identifying children with blunt intra-abdominal injuries. J Pediatr. 2014;165(6):1230-1235.e5. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.08.014  PMID:25266346 
8.
Emergency department practice variation in computed tomography use for children with minor blunt head trauma. J Pediatr. 2014;165(6):1201-1206.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.08.008  PMID:25294604 
9.
Epidemiology of blunt head trauma in children in U.S. emergency departments. N Engl J Med. 2014;371(20):1945-1947. doi:10.1056/NEJMc1407902  PMID:25390756 
10.
Isolated loss of consciousness in children with minor blunt head trauma. JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(9):837-843. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.361  PMID:25003654 
© 2017 by Washington University in St. Louis
One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130