S. Paul Hmiel, M.D., Ph.D.  hmiel@kids.wustl.edu

Professor of Pediatrics, Nephrology
Patient Oriented Research UnitNephrology

phone: (314) 286-1574

Education

  • BS, Case Western Reserve University 1980
  • PhD, Case Western Reserve University 1987
  • MD, Case Western Reserve University1989
  • MSc, Churchill College, University of Cambridge 1981

Training

  • Resident , St Louis Children's Hospital1989 - 1991
  • Fellow, St. Louis Children's Hospital1991 - 1994

Licensure and Board Certification

  • MO, State License 1993
  • American Board of Pediatrics/Pediatric Nephrology Certificate #000467 (recert in 2014) 2002
  • Pediatrics Board Certificate #053551/American Board of Pediatrics (Recert in 2008) 2008
  • IL, State License 2014
  • American Board of Preventive Medicine - Clinical Informatics 2016

Honors

  • Churchill Scholar, Churchill College, Cambridge, UK1980
  • Saunders Award in Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University1989
  • Upjohn Award in Clinical Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University1989
  • National Kidney Foundation of Eastern Missouri and MetroEast, Research Fellow1992 - 1993
  • National Kidney Foundation/American Society of Nephrology/Pfizer Fellow1993 - 1994
  • Outstanding Teacher Award, Pediatric Residents of St Louis Children's Hospital2001
  • Outstanding Division Teaching Award, Pediatric Residents of St Louis Children's Hospital, MO2002 - 2003
  • Outstanding Division Teaching Award, Pediatric Residents of St Louis Children's Hospital, MO2003 - 2004
  • Outstanding Subspecialty Teaching Award, Pediatric Residents of St Louis Childrens Hospital2005 - 2006
  • Best Doctors in America2005 - 2016
  • Outstanding Subspecialty Teaching Award, Pediatric Residents of St Louis Childrens Hospital2015 - 2016

Selected Publications view all (26)


1.
Using an interactive water bottle to target fluid adherence in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: a pilot study. Pediatr Transplant. 2015;19(1):35-41. doi:10.1111/petr.12385  PMID:25388882 
2.
Single-center experience in pediatric renal transplantation using thymoglobulin induction and steroid minimization. Pediatr Transplant. 2014;18(8):816-21. doi:10.1111/petr.12374  PMID:25311592 
3.
Successful use of plasma exchange for profound hemolysis in a child with loxoscelism. Pediatrics. 2014;134(5):e1464-7. doi:10.1542/peds.2013-3338  PMID:25349320 
4.
Pediatric Hematuria Remains a Clinical Dilemma. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2014. doi:10.1177/0009922814551137  PMID:25253774 
5.
Citrate anticoagulation during continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric critical care. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2014;15(5):471-85. doi:10.1097/PCC.0000000000000148  PMID:24777299 
6.
Measuring family management of transplant tasks: the transplant responsibility questionnaire. Pediatr Transplant. 2013;17(3):307-14. doi:10.1111/petr.12064  PMID:23489734 
7.
Traditional and targeted exome sequencing reveals common, rare and novel functional deleterious variants in RET-signaling complex in a cohort of living US patients with urinary tract malformations. Hum Genet. 2012;131(11):1725-38. doi:10.1007/s00439-012-1181-3  PMCID:PMC3551468  PMID:22729463 
8.
Human polyomaviruses in children undergoing transplantation, United States, 2008-2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(10):1676-9. doi:10.3201/eid1810.120359  PMCID:PMC3471627  PMID:23017293 
9.
Urinary incontinence in the CKiD cohort and health related quality of life. J Urol. 2009;182(4 Suppl):2007-14. doi:10.1016/j.juro.2009.06.012  PMCID:PMC2950781  PMID:19695588 
10.
Limitations of cyclosporine C2 monitoring in pediatric heart transplant recipients. Pediatr Transplant. 2007;11(5):524-9. doi:10.1111/j.1399-3046.2007.00712.x  PMID:17631021