Mark J. Manary, M.D.  manary@kids.wustl.edu

Professor of Pediatrics, Emergency Medicine
Researcher, Patient Oriented Research Unit
Patient Oriented Research UnitEmergency Medicine

phone: 314-454-2178

Research Interests

Dr. Mark Manary's vision is to solve pediatric malnutrition. He was one of the first champions of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), a lipid-based food rich in calories and nutrients, to treat uncomplicated severe malnutrition in a child's home, away from hospitals burdened with malnourished children. He conducted the first clinical trial of RUTF in 2001; because of his work, this therapy is now standard of care worldwide. He devotes several months each year to overseeing clinical and translational studies in Malawi, Sierra Lone and Ghana and traveling from village to village treating thousands of malnourished children. The scope of his work includes developing and introducing novel foods, active prevention schemes, and gut microbiota and metabolome in kwashiorkor and marasmus. One of Dr. Manary's current role is a lead scientist in the "Malnutrition Interventions" project for the Peanut & Mycotoxin Innovation Lab, A Feed the Future program. www.pmil.caes.uga.edu

Education

  • BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology1977
  • MD, Washington University School of Medicine1982

Training

  • Internship and Residency, St. Louis Children's Hospital1982 - 1985

Licensure and Board Certification

  • MO, Medical License 1984
  • American Board of Pediatrics 1988
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support 1989
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support - Affiliate Faculty 1989
  • Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (S.A.F.E.) - Provider 1989
  • American Board of Pediatrics, Subspecialty Pediatric Emergency Medicine 1994

Honors

  • CIBA Award of Community Service1980
  • St. Louis Pediatric Society Award1982
  • Fulbright Scholar1994 - 1995
  • Academic Humanitarian Physician of the Year, American Association of Medical Colleges2004
  • AOA Member, Washington University Chapter2005
  • Outstanding Graduate Student Mentor Award, Washington University Graduate Student Senate2006
  • Excellence in Pediatrics Award, St. Louis Pediatric Society2007
  • Rose Award for Community Education, St. Louis County Public Schools2007
  • Washington University Distinguished Alumni Faculty Award2007
  • Distinuished Community Service Award, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine2012
  • Named as a WHO Expert Advisory on the Management of Malnutrition in Children2012

Selected Publications view all (141)


Publication Co-Authors

1.
Environmental Enteric Dysfunction is Associated with Altered Bile Acid Metabolism. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2016;104(1):191-197. PMID:27322559 
2.
The Association of Serum Choline With Linear Growth Failure in Young Children From Rural Malawi. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;104(1):191-197. PMID:27281303 
3.
Metabolic Alterations in Children With Environmental Enteric Dysfunction. Sci Rep. 2016;6:28009. PMCID:PMC4904796  PMID:27294788 
4.
Droplet digital PCR Quantifies Host Inflammatory Transcripts in Feces Reliably and Reproducibly Cell Immunol. 2016;303:43-49. PMID:27063479 
5.
Child Stunting is Associated with Low Circulating Essential Amino Acids. EBioMedicine. 2016;6:246-452. PMCID:PMC4856740  PMID:27211567 
6.
Including Whey Protein and Whey Permeate in Ready-To-Use Supplementary Food Improves Recovery Rates in Children With Moderate Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(3):926-933. doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.124636  PMID:26864368 
7.
New Insights Into Environmental Enteric Dysfunction. Arch Dis Child. 2016;101(8):741-744. PMID:26933151 
8.
Protein Quality and Growth in Malnourished Children Food Nutr Bull. 2016;37 Suppl 1:S29-S36. PMID:26857118 
9.
Gut Bacteria That Prevent Growth Impairments Transmitted by Microbiota from Malnourished Children. Science. 2016;351(6275). PMCID:PMC4787260  PMID:26912898 
10.
Protein Quality and Growth in Malnourished Children. Food Nutr Bull. 2016. doi:10.1177/0379572116629023  PMID:26857118